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    Most people assume cosmetics and personal care products are tested for safety before being stocked on store shelves. In truth, personal care products are one of the least regulated industries in the U.S. On April 20, 2015, Senators Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, introduced the Personal Care Products Safety Act of 2015. The bill seeks to reform a $71 billion industry that is currently regulated by approximately two pages of federal law that has only been updated once in the past 76 years.

    Strong provisions in the bill would advance the FDA’s ability to protect Americans’ health by improving current law in the following areas:
    – Directing the FDA to assess the safety of a minimum of five cosmetics chemicals a year;
    – Requiring companies to register their facilities, products and ingredients with the FDA;
    – Requiring companies to comply with good manufacturing practices;
    – Closing labeling loopholes by requiring full ingredient disclosure for professional salon products and web-based sales of cosmetic products; and
    – Giving the FDA mandatory recall authority to get unsafe products off the shelves.

    However, strengthening amendments are needed in the following areas:
    – Strengthen the bill’s weak safety standard MORE…
    – Industry self-certification of safety needs to be more robust MORE…
    – Fragrance ingredients should not remain a mystery MORE…
    – Data sharing of safety studies should be required MORE…
    – Provide consumer-right-to-know about cosmetic products causing adverse reactions MORE…
    – Remove federal preemption MORE…

    If you would like more information about the bill, or want to get more involved, please email info@safecosmetics.org
    FDA’s Lack of Authority

    The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act (FFDCA) includes 112 pages of standards for food and drugs, but just a single page for cosmetics. The cosmetics title of the FFDCA, which has not been amended significantly since it was enacted more than 75 years ago, provides virtually no power to perform even the most rudimentary functions to ensure the safety of an estimated $71 billion cosmetic industry.

    Source:  http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/regulations/us-laws/